Johnnycake Project

The Johnnycake tenement has been confirmed as hosting the regionally prospective Mt Toussaint Trachyte in a favourable structural setting for Mt Carlton style epithermal gold-silver. Reconnaissance mapping at the Szarbs Prospect has confirmed strong evidence of a shallow high-sulphidation epithermal system hosted within Mt Toussaint Trachyte. A number of other coincident magnetic and radiometric anomalies have been followed up via tenement scale mapping and sampling and yielded a further exciting prospect, Sledgehammer.

Sledgehammer Prospect

  • The Sledgehammer Prospect has produced high grade rock chip assays from an outcrop of silicified hydrothermal breccia including a single sample yielding 47g/t gold and 38g/t silver

  • This outcrop sits central to, and is consistent with, a broader gold and silver in soil anomaly

  • The prospectivity of Sledgehammer is underpinned by a series of co-incident geophysical anomalies which bear the hallmarks of a hydrothermal system overprint


The prospectivity is underpinned by a series of co-incident geophysical anomalies which bear the hallmarks of a hydrothermal system overprint. These are:The Sledgehammer Prospect (Figure 2) is located within a volcaniclastic sequence, inferred to overlie locally present trachyte and andesite at depth.

The prospect is linked to a deep seated structure in the form of a major basement break interpreted from the gravity and supported by the magnetic datasets. This feature is considered regionally significant and has a high potential to provide a favourable pathway for hydrothermal fluids. Another prominent feature of the gravity dataset is a broad dense gravity feature (anomaly) which sits below the prospect and potentially links to the major basement break. This feature could either reflect an intrusive source or dense mineralised body;

Coincident with this gravity anomaly is a broad zone of demagnetisation. The favoured interpretation of this zone is that the destruction of primary magnetite signature resulting in the broad anomaly is due to the hydrothermal overprint associated with phyllic and propylitic alteration; and

Broadly co-incident with these two anomalies is evidence of anomalous conductivity within the 100-150 conductivity depth slice which SRK recommended should be investigated for the possibility of conductivity associated with hydrothermal alteration. SRK reports that elevated conductivity is consistent with clay alteration zones and provides more weight of evidence for the presence of a sizeable hydrothermal system preserved at Sledgehammer.

At surface, the zone interpreted as hydrothermally overprinted based on geophysical data, exhibits intense and laterally extensive alteration in outcrop (supported by thin section and PIMA analysis) characterised by propylitic and phyllic alteration assemblages. This alteration zone is co-incident with elevated geochemistry. Geochemically the prospect has been sampled by both soil (historic) and rock chip (this phase of work) and is characterised by:

A broader halo of anomalous As hosting strong Au and Ag anomalism, weakly elevated Cu (± elevated Pb, Te and B) consistent with an epithermal system; and A corresponding zone of anomalous gold and silver in rock chip samples, including one exposure in the north of the prospect hosting brecciated and intensively altered volcaniclastics with significant mineralisation at surface (up to 47g/t Au).

This outcrop sits central to, and is consistent with, the broader Au and Ag in soil anomaly.

The anomalous rock chip results within the breccia zone, in conjunction with the adjacent broader Au anomalism in soil and more distal Au anomalism in rock chip results throughout the broader prospect highlight the potential of the area to host economic Au ± Ag mineralisation.

Sledgehammer bears all the hallmark features of a significant and highly prospective epithermal system and is exhibiting attributes to date that warrant significant follow-up exploration work. A pole-dipole induced polarisation survey has commenced at the Sledgehammer Prospect, under the direction of a highly experienced consultant geophysicist, which is aimed at assisting in the definition of future drill targets.

Szarbs Prospect

The Szarbs prospect is located within a prospective trachyte host unit interpreted to be part of the Mt Toussaint Trachyte which hosts the Mt Carlton series of deposits approximately 20kms to the north.

Geophysically, the prospect is located over a zone of demagnetisation that is interpreted to reflect the effects of propylitic and phyllic alteration associated with a hydrothermal system. At surface, SRK notes the presence of an alteration overprint in outcrop. The alteration is characteristic of an argillic and phyllic alteration classification extending to silicic alteration around the margins of the system.

Geochemically the prospect has been sampled by both soil (historic) and rock chip (this phase of work) and is characterised by:

  • A broader halo of anomalous As hosting patchy Ag (strong anomaly) and Au (weak anomaly) soil anomalism central to the alteration zone;

  • A series of elemental associations, i.e., elevated As, Ag, Au, Pb, Te and Bi consistent with an epithermal system; and

  • A corresponding zone of anomalous silver in rock chip samples up to 10g/t Ag (this program) and up to 71g/t Ag historical sample  supporting that the system has the potential to host significant Ag (±Au) mineralisation.

The combined demagnetisation associated with classic high-sulphidation alteration assemblages and a geochemistry which supports the deposit style (i.e., the relevant indicator element and metallogenic assemblages) provides strong evidence of a shallow high-sulphidation epithermal system at Szarbs. Importantly, the core of the system (i.e. the potentially mineralising zone) does not appear to be exposed, and is therefore, expectantly preserved at shallow depth.


Paul Szabo 1939 – 2014

Paul Szabo was instrumental in the discovery of the Mt Carlton/Silver Hill gold and silver deposit in 2006, and continued to be a valuable member of the Conquest and Forte team until health problems forced his retirement in 2013.

He had an incredible depth of knowledge built up from decades of real world experience in the field in North Queensland. Paul’s passion for his work, his brutal honesty and loyalty will long be remembered.